Rikki Endsley interviews Ada Initiative executive director for USENIX ;login:

Valerie Aurora

Valerie Aurora

Rikki Endsley interviewed Ada Initiative executive director Valerie Aurora for ;login: magazine, a monthly magazine from the USENIX Advanced Computing Association. Rikki has written extensively on women in open source over the years, including a blog post many of our readers may be familiar with, “To my daughter’s high school programming teacher.”

Rikki interviewed Valerie about her career as a file systems developer, the Ada Initiative, and the on-going Linux kernel civility discussion, spearheaded by Linux USB developer Sarah Sharp.

An excerpt from one of Valerie’s answers in the interview about the Linux civility discussions:

I’m one of hundreds of Linux kernel developers, past and present, who agree with Sarah Sharp’s request [for more civility in Linux kernel development] — she’s just the person brave enough to directly call for change from Linus Torvalds and other community leadership. I was a little horrified to see how many top-notch kernel developers spoke up to say that this is one reason why they dropped out of kernel development. So I’m thrilled to hear this will be a topic of discussion at the next Linux Kernel Summit. I hope that other kernel developers will join her in standing up for a working environment without abuse.

I think Linus [insisted on the value of hostile discussion] based on the information he has. For example, he’s probably not aware of research showing that people’s intuition that performance improves after severely criticizing someone is wrong: any improvement in performance is due to random chance, what many people are familiar with as “regression to the mean.” It turns out that when you evaluate the effect of criticism vs. praise on performance scientifically, praise is the clear winner. We as computer programmers should use the same scientific logical approach to community management as we do for software development.

Read more at the USENIX web site.