Category Archives: Ada Initiative news

Announcing the end of the AdaCamp program

AdaCamp logo

We are deeply sorry to announce that the Ada Initiative will no longer run any more AdaCamp unconferences for women in open technology and culture. The recent departure of several staff members has left us without the capacity to run any more AdaCamps in 2015. In addition, AdaCamp has always cost more to run than we could raise in sponsorships, and that shows no signs of changing.

As a result, we have decided the most effective way to support women in open technology and culture is to stop running AdaCamps ourselves and instead open source the AdaCamp Toolkit – a collection of very detailed planning documents that lay out how to run an event like AdaCamp. We’ve already shared our AdaCamp policies for free re-use and will release the rest of the materials in the next month.

This is an incredibly difficult decision to make because we know that AdaCamp was literally life-changing for so many women. As a result of AdaCamp, women expanded their professional networks, founded new companies, overcame their Impostor Syndrome, moved into better jobs, got raises, built lasting friendships, and came out reinvigorated and inspired to make open technology and culture a better place. We don’t want this kind of revolutionary change to stop, which is why we are working on the final touches of the AdaCamp Toolkit and will release it free for use by all in the next month. We are excited by conferences such as &:conf and Open Source Bridge and recommend that would-be AdaCampers go to them.

As we have run only one of our four promised AdaCamps in 2015, we have offered a 100% refund to all of the AdaCamp 2015 sponsors, including Puppet LabsGoogle Montreal and Chrome, the Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Simple, Etsy, MongoDB, Plotly, Shopify and Engine Yard. Any funds left over will be used to help open source the AdaCamp Toolkit and further our work to support women in open technology and culture, such as the Ally Skills Workshop and Impostor Syndrome Training. We thank our sponsors again for their support of women in open technology and culture!

80 women cheering and wearing many different colors, CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

AdaCamp Portland attendees in 2014
CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

Thank you so much to everyone who made AdaCamp possible, and especially the women who attended and took part in sessions. Together, we raised the bar for what to expect from a conference: explicit consent for photographs, designated access lanes, delicious food for everyone’s needs, quiet rooms, affordable accommodations, screening of attendees, speedy handling of harassment, and clearly stated expectations for respectful behavior. Dozens of conferences are more welcoming to people with disabilities, people with food restrictions, introverted people, and people who just want a more respectful environment. We hope AdaCampers will continue to be leaders in improving the conference experience for everyone!

Thank you outgoing volunteers Rachel Chalmers and Camille Acey

The Ada Initiative would like to thank two long time Ada Initiative volunteers who have recently stepped back from a volunteer position with us. Thank you for your work with us, to Rachel Chalmers, who served as a member of our board of directors for more than four years since our founding in 2011, and to Camille Acey, who served as an advisor in 2014 and 2015. Best wishes for your activism and other work in future!

Crystal Huff leaving the Ada Initiative

We are sad to announce that Crystal Huff is moving on from executive director of the Ada Initiative, effective today. We are grateful for the energy and enthusiasm Crystal brought to the job, and wish her the best in all her future endeavors!

While the Ada Initiative board of directors decides the organization’s next steps, Valerie Aurora will serve as interim Executive Director. We are looking forward to running three more AdaCamps and teaching many more Ally Skills Workshops and Impostor Syndrome Trainings in 2015. Thank you to all our supporters who make this work possible!

Ada Initiative welcomes Amelia Greenhall and Andrea Horbinski to our board of directors

The Ada Initiative’s governing board of directors, responsible for running our organization, welcomes our new directors Amelia Greenhall and Andrea Horbinski. Amelia and Andrea are existing members of our advisors group, and both bring us officer experience from other non-profits.

Photo of Amelia Greenhall

Amelia Greenhall is the Chief Creative Officer of Magic Vibes Corporation. She’s also the cofounder and Executive Director of Double Union, a non-profit feminist community workshop, and she publishes the Open Review Quarterly literary journal.

Woman smiling

Andrea Horbinski is a PhD candidate in history and new media at UC Berkeley. She is Secretary of the Board of the Organization for Transformative Works and the co-chair of Wiscon 40 in 2016.

The Ada Initiative also welcomes Sue Gardner back to the board of directors. Sue originally served as a director from 2011 until April 2014 and returns in 2015. Together, Amelia, Andrea and Sue comprise our officers in 2015; Amelia as President, Andrea as Secretary and Sue as Treasurer. They join continuing directors Rachel Chalmers, Mary Gardiner, Alicia Gibb, and Marina Zhurakhinskaya on the board for 2015.

This board transition is a significant milestone for the Ada Initiative, as one of our outgoing directors is Valerie Aurora, Ada Initiative co-founder, who served as both Executive Director and Board President from 2011 to 2015. We’re excited as an organization to be in a position to move beyond being governed by our founders! As announced in March, while she’s stepping down from her positions at the head of the organization, Valerie continues on our staff as the Director of Training under new Executive Director Crystal Huff. Our other co-founder, Mary Gardiner, remains as a board member and staff member. Mary intends to retire from the board in 2016.

We also thank our other outgoing directors, Sumana Harihareswara (2014–2015) and Caroline Simard (2012–2015) for their hard work on behalf of the Ada Initiative during their terms, and wish them good luck with their many other projects.

Welcoming Crystal Huff as the new Executive Director of the Ada Initiative

A smiling woman facing the camera with purple accents in her hair

Crystal Huff, our new Executive Director

Back in December, we announced that the Ada Initiative was looking for a new Executive Director. Three months and more than 130 amazing applications later, we are happy to announce that we have found her! On Monday, Crystal Huff will be the Ada Initiative’s new Executive Director, leading us in our mission to support women in open technology and culture.

Crystal has a long history of both professional and volunteer work in various parts of open technology and culture, with a particular commitment to anti-harassment work. She takes the place of our former Executive Director and co-founder, Valerie Aurora, who is staying with the Ada Initiative as Director of Training in charge of Ally Skills Workshops and similar classes. Under Crystal’s leadership, the Ada Initiative’s programs will continue to grow in reach and impact, while staying focused on women in open tech/culture and anti-harassment. Keep reading to learn more about our new director and the Ada Initiative’s plans!

Crystal combines executive experience from both the software industry and the science fiction and fantasy community. She served as the Chief Coherence Officer of Luminoso, a Boston-area startup building text analytics software that actively open sources some of its software. Her duties included establishing company policies, coordinating the hiring process during a period of high company growth, helping raise several million dollars in two rounds of funding, and serving as Scrum Master for the company’s Agile software development process. On the science fiction and fantasy side, Crystal has chaired or held key leadership positions with many volunteer-run SF&F conventions, including Readercon, a literary convention in its 26th year, and Arisia, New England’s largest and most diverse science fiction and fantasy convention. She is also an American representative on the executive board for the Helsinki bid for WorldCon in 2017, working with over 200 volunteers from 26 countries.

Crystal has a long history of anti-harassment work, including speaking about and advocating for anti-harassment policies at conventions worldwide. Her highest profile work was as the chair of the Readercon convention committee (concom) in 2012. A well-known member of the SF&F community harassed an attendee at the event and the Readercon board failed to enforce the con’s published anti-harassment policy. In partnership with Rose Fox, Crystal led the Readercon concom through a process of accountability and reform that resulted in a public apology, significant changes to the organization, and successful Readercon conventions in the years since. Their clear, honest, comprehensive public statement detailing their response is recommended reading for any organization serious about handling harassment well.

Crystal’s experience, qualifications, and demonstrated passion for our core mission are why we are incredibly excited to announce her joining the Ada Initiative as our new Executive Director! Crystal will continue to live and work in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, a well-known technology hub, and travel worldwide to spend time with women in open technology and culture and the people who support them.

What’s next for the Ada Initiative in 2015? Now that the Executive Director search is over, we can continue to grow the Ada Initiative’s staff with the goal of meeting the demand for our existing programs, including AdaCamps, Ally Skills Workshops, and Impostor Syndrome Training. Several new positions will probably open up over the next year, so if you have always wanted to work for the Ada Initiative, now is the time to start polishing your résumé! After we’ve ramped up our existing programs to match demand, we will investigate developing new programs and training, such as a much-requested workshop on how to handle harassment reports. We are excited to see what we can do!

Thank you to everyone who contributed to our Executive Director search! Thank you first and foremost to our two search committee chairs, Sumana Harihareswara and Mary Gardiner, and to our search consultant. Thank you to the rest of our search committee and our board of directors, who put in many hours of work into the process. Thank you to our advisors and everyone who spread the word about the position. Thank you to everyone who applied (all of the more than 130 of you – we’re so flattered!). And thank you to our donors and sponsors, each and every one of you, who make our work to support women in open technology and culture possible. We couldn’t do it without you!

Welcome new advisors!

The Ada Initiative has a wonderful advisory board which gives us feedback on planned projects and our overall mission and strategy. We’re excited to welcome six new members who joined us at the beginning of 2015:

Photograph of Danielle Citron

Danielle Keats Citron is a Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. She has given lectures and interviews to esteemed publications and institutions, and blogs for Forbes. Her book on online harassment, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, published by Harvard University Press, is a culmination of her expertise and passion for information privacy, civil rights, and administrative law.

Photo of Alison Dahl CrossleyAlison Dahl Crossley is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, where she co-organized the October 2014 Online Feminism Conference. She’s currently working on her postdoctoral manuscript Finding Feminism: College Students, Feminist Mobilization, and the Unfinished Gender Revolution. Her areas of research, teaching and writing focus on gender and feminism, emerging forms of political contestation, social movements, culture, digital media, and research methods.

Photo of Kathleen DanielsonKathleen Danielson is a lover of maps, tech, and open source. She has experience in building online communities as well as turning those online communities into offline ones. She is currently a Developer Advocate for Mapzen and serves on the Board of Directors for OpenStreetMap US.

Photo of Ashley FarmerAshley D. Farmer is a Provost Postdoctoral Fellow at Duke University, and is currently completing her manuscript What You’ve Got is a Revolution: Black Women’s Movements for Black Power. Her scholarship on women’s history, gender history, radical politics, and black feminism has appeared in numerous publications and has been featured on the History Channel. She is a frequent blogger for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).  

Photo of Amelia GreenhallAmelia Greenhall has worked on product development, design, user experience and marketing for a number of venture funded startups. She is currently cofounder and Chief Creative Officer of tech start-up Magic Vibes Corporation and cofounder and Executive Director of Double Union, a non-profit feminist hackerspace. She publishes The Open Review Quarterly and cofounded Model View Culture, a publication focused on culture and diversity.

Photo of Ryan KennedyRyan Kennedy is a software engineer with a passion for open platforms, community involvement, software engineering best practices and management, and hack days. He’s worked on EarthLink, Excite@Home, Yahoo!, Yammer and is an active participant in Dropwizard projects.

We’d like to thank our outgoing advisors — Sumana Harihareswara, Constanza Heath, Liz Henry, Noopur Raval, and Gayle Karen Young — for their help, advice and support of the Ada Initiative over several years! We wish them all the best with their many ongoing projects.

The Ada Initiative does not support Vivek Wadhwa’s women in technology research

We were dismayed to learn last week that Ada Initiative Executive Director Valerie Aurora and at least one other woman were publicly advertised without their consent as “ambassadors” (screenshot, current page) for the “Innovating Women” book co-authored by Vivek Wadhwa. This, in combination with our contributions to the book, may be interpreted as implying a partnership between Ada Initiative and Vivek Wadhwa that does not exist. If such a partnership existed, Vivek Wadhwa would have violated the Ada Initiative sponsor/partner policy by making public comments resulting in the silencing of voices of women in technology. Wadhwa’s actions are counter to the Ada Initiative’s mission to increase the participation and status of women in open technology and culture.

At no time did Aurora consent to be listed as an “ambassador” for the book. She was included because she answered interview questions from one of the co-authors of the book in July 2013 on the subject of harassment of women at technology conferences and what the Ada Initiative is doing to stop it. No one asked for her permission to put her on a list of ambassadors for the book. We appreciate the swift removal of her name from this page after she requested it, but her name and that of at least one other woman should never have been on there in the first place.

While we stand by the [trigger warning: sexual assault] content of the interview Valerie gave that is included in the book, we deeply regret collaborating in the creation of a book whose lead author has engaged in behavior resulting in the silencing the voices of women in technology. In the future, we will vet interview requests more thoroughly.

Women in technology are perfectly capable of speaking for themselves. We recommend anyone seeking an expert speaker or writer on the subject of women in technology seek out women in technology who have studied the subject (start with the Geek Feminism list of geek feminists willing to be interviewed by the press).

Thanks to you, 2014 was another huge year for the Ada Initiative!

Happy December! We come with good news for women in open technology and culture, and we hope you’re as happy about it as we are!

a group of AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

Since our last update in mid-2014, we announced that we are growing by hiring a new executive director, a Linux kernel contributor donated $100,000, we ran 2 more AdaCamps (for a total of 3 AdaCamps on 3 continents), and taught 9 more Ally Skills Workshops. Keep reading for more details, and thanking you for being part of another fantastic year for women in open technology and culture!

The Ada Initiative is growing! Help our search for our new Executive Director!

Valerie Aurora and Mary Gardiner founded the Ada Initiative in 2011 to increase the participation and status of women in open technology and culture. After decades of seeing volunteers burning out, they wanted to know: if we applied the feminist principle of paying people for their work to our activism, could we make more progress for women in open tech/culture? The answer: unequivocally yes!

When we reviewed our programs late this year, we realized that there was more demand for our work than we had the ability to supply. Each of our AdaCamp unconferences, held on three continents this year, sold out several weeks earlier than expected. Our Ally Skills Workshops are booked solid into 2015. And we can’t launch our standalone Impostor Syndrome Training soon enough for everyone emailing us about it!

That’s why we’ve just announced the search for our most important hire yet: a new Executive Director, who will lead the Ada Initiative as we grow to 5 – 15 staff members over the next few years. We’re so excited to meet the person who will take the Ada Initiative to the next level!

Anonymous Linux kernel contributor gives $100,000 to support women in Linux

A woman explains while a man listens

Ally Skills Workshop discussion

In mid-December, we were proud to announce that, on top of the $215,000 given by 1100 donors in our 2014 fundraising drive, a Linux kernel contributor who wishes to remain anonymous gave $100,000 to help us create a Linux community that is more diverse and more inclusive than proprietary software, not less. Linux is the world’s leading free and open source software project, and serves as a model to other open source software projects around the world.

Thanks to this donation, the Ada Initiative will be able to teach 4 Ally Skills Workshops at Linux-related conferences free of charge in 2015, and give 100 hours of free consulting to Linux-related organizations working on making the community more welcoming. If your Linux-related conference or organization is interested in either of these offers, email us at contact@adainitiative.org.

Ally Skills Workshops for all!

Our Ally Skills Workshops are going from strength to strength. Since June 2014, we have run 9 more workshops teaching over 160 people how to respond to (or prevent) sexism in their communities, including one at the Skepticon conference for skeptics and atheists. We are now scheduling Ally Skills Workshops starting in January 2015. If your organization or event is interested in an Ally Skills Workshop, email us at contact@adainitiative.org.

Three AdaCamps on three continents!

80 women cheering and wearing many different colors, CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

Happy AdaCampers!
CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

We’ve been delighted this year to gather women in open technology and culture not only in the United States, but in Germany and India too! Learn more about our 2014 AdaCamps in the post-event reports for AdaCamp Portland, AdaCamp Berlin, and AdaCamp Bangalore!

And keep an eye out for the of our 2015 locations, coming soon!

Pssst, don’t tell anyone who hasn’t read this in a public blog post and widely distributed email but we think we can say this: we’re working to bring AdaCamp to Montréal just after a certain major programming language conference in April! Later in the year, we’re hoping to announce AdaCamps in Central America, the US West Coast and Australia/New Zealand. Stay tuned for announcements!

Supporting our work in 2015

SoManyShirts

2015 will be another huge leap forward for the Ada Initiative and women in open technology and culture. We’re shortly announcing 2015’s AdaCamps and the availability of our Impostor Syndrome training workshops, with more to come!

Your end of year gift will let us provide low-cost tickets and travel grants to AdaCampers, develop Ally Skills and Impostor Syndrome training materials and provide free consulting to open technology and culture programs and events on how to include women contributors.

And if you donate $256 (or $20 monthly) before January 1, we will give you one of our beautiful “Not Afraid to Say the F-word: Feminism” t-shirts!

Donate now

If you’ve donated already in 2014, you can still help out: your employer’s matching program just might double your donationOur donation FAQ has the info your employer may need to match your gift. You often need to make a matching requests soon after the year ends, so check your employer’s program today.

We hope you’re looking forward to finding out what 2015 holds as much as we are!

For those of you making end-of-year donations to charity, the Ada Initiative is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) non-profit. Your donation may be tax-deductible in the U.S. For general information, see our donation FAQ, but please ask your tax advisor for individual advice.

The Ada Initiative is growing! Announcing our search for a new Executive Director

Silver laptop with f-word sticker on it

Are you not afraid to say the f-word, feminism? You may be the next ED of the Ada Initiative!

Update: We have found our new executive director! Please join us in welcoming Crystal Huff.

The Ada Initiative is growing – by hiring a new Executive Director! Keep reading for why we are taking this important step, and how you can apply for this exciting job. (Already know you are interested? Read the job description now!)

Valerie Aurora and Mary Gardiner founded the Ada Initiative in 2011 to increase the participation and status of women in open technology and culture. After decades of seeing volunteers burning out, they wanted to know: if we applied the feminist principle of paying people for their work to our activism, could we make more progress for women in open tech/culture? The answer: unequivocally yes! Since our founding, hundreds of open tech/culture conferences have adopted and enforced anti-harassment policies, many communities have adopted online codes of conduct, and the percentage of women attending or speaking at conferences has increased dramatically in several communities.

When we reviewed our programs late this year, we realized that there was more demand for our work than we had the ability to supply. Each of our AdaCamp unconferences, held on three continents this year, sold out several weeks earlier than expected. Our Ally Skills Workshops are booked solid into 2015. And we can’t launch our standalone Impostor Syndrome Training soon enough for everyone emailing us about it! Fortunately, we also had a banner year for fundraising, raising $215,000 during our yearly fundraising drive and landing our first $100,000 donation.

That’s why we’re announcing the search for our most important hire yet: a new Executive Director, who will lead the Ada Initiative as we grow to 5 – 15 staff members over the next few years. Our current Executive Director and co-founder, Valerie Aurora, will shift into a role as Director of Training, working full time on the Ally Skills Workshop and Impostor Syndrome Training programs. Our other two current staff members, co-founder and Deputy Executive Director Mary Gardiner, and Director of Operations Suki McCoy, are staying on as well.

The new Executive Director will lead the overall organization: setting priorities, deciding which programs to run and where, and periodically re-examining our scope and mission. They will also lead our fundraising efforts and manage our staff members and consultants. This is a fulfilling, exciting, and challenging job. Successful candidates will need to be not only organized, financially savvy, and responsible, but also flexible, creative, funny, inspirational, supportive, and comfortable with uncertainty. In addition, the ability to handle conflict well is particularly important, as conflict is an inevitable part of successful activism. The full job description is here.

Please share this job description far and wide! If you know someone that you think would be a good candidate, please forward this job description to them. If that isn’t appropriate, you can send your suggestion to jobs@adainitiative.org.

This exciting success and growth over the last few years has been, and will continue to be, made possible by you: our donors. As a service-oriented non-profit, salaries are by far our biggest expense. While corporate sponsors and fees for our training workshops help cover some of our costs, donations from individuals are our largest source of funding. This allows us to stay independent and mission-focused. Thank you so much for your incredibly important support!

­Sumana Harihareswara
Chair of the Ada Initiative Executive Director search committee
on behalf of the Ada Initiative board of directors

Anonymous donor gives $100,000 to support women in Linux

Today we are proud to announce a $100,000 donation to the Ada Initiative to support women in open technology and culture, on top of the $215,000 given by 1100 donors in our 2014 fundraising drive. The donor, a Linux kernel contributor who wishes to remain anonymous, is motivated by the continuing low proportion of women in the Linux kernel development community: currently around 1-5%, as compared to about 20% in closed source software development. Our donor believes that free and open source software like Linux should be more diverse and more open to underrepresented groups than closed source software, not less.

In response to this generous donation, the Ada Initiative pledges to teach 4 Ally Skills Workshops free of charge at Linux-related conferences in 2015, and give 100 hours of free consulting to Linux-related organizations working on making the community more welcoming.

Why focus on women in Linux?

The Linux project, now 23 years old, is one of the world’s best known and longest lived free and open source software projects, and continues to serve as a model to other projects. The culture of Linux kernel development strongly influences open source culture as a whole. People in all open source projects would benefit from a healthy, inclusive, and welcoming Linux kernel community.

Increasing the proportion of women in Linux to at least match that in proprietary software is a difficult task for many reasons, among them a culture of verbal and emotional abuse perpetuated by some leading Linux developers, including the Linux project leader, Linus Torvalds. This abuse affects people of all genders, as shown by Lennart Poettering’s description of the harassment and threats he experiences, but it is especially harmful to women given the additional barriers they face such as sexism, stereotype threat, sexual assault, and other gender-related discrimination. Solving the problems that contribute to the low percentage of women in Linux will also make the Linux community better for most people, regardless of their gender.

Many Linux community members already want a more productive and welcoming working environment, and are looking for specific, concrete ways they can help make that a reality. The Ally Skills Workshop teaches these people the skills to respond when they see sexist or abusive behavior, as well as how to prevent it from happening in the first place. In the workshop, people learn specific techniques for how to have more productive and useful discussions, how to implement codes of conduct that support good technical decision-making, how to avoid wasting time and energy on unproductive arguments, and how to improve listening skills and reduce defensiveness. All of these skills help create a more productive, creative, and rewarding working environment for the vast majority of Linux community members.

Progress for women in Linux

The good news for women in Linux is that, after 4 years of advocacy spearheaded by the Ada Initiative, all major Linux conferences now have strong, enforceable anti-harassment policies as of November 2014. These policies have significantly reduced the incidence of many kinds of in-person abuse at Linux conferences, including physical and sexual assault, pornography in presentations, and sexist jokes by keynote speakers. The next step is spreading this kind of cultural change from conferences to online interaction in the Linux community, as the Django, Python, and Rust communities have done so successfully in recent years.

To support the many Linux community members who have been working for a more humane working environment for many years, the Ada Initiative will teach 4 Ally Skills Workshops at Linux-related conferences in 2015, free of charge to attendees or the conference. These workshops will train up to 120 advocates to fight for major, systemic changes in the Linux development culture, using best practices from other open source communities that have successfully increased the participation of women. We will also reserve 100 staff hours to provide free consulting to Linux-related organizations working towards the goal of a less toxic, more productive Linux development culture. If you would like to host one of these workshops or consult with us, email us at contact@adainitiative.org.

Our Ally Skills Workshops are in high demand by software companies, foundations, and conferences, and are often fully booked months in advance. We developed the workshop over 3 years, drawing on many years of experience in open tech/culture communities. We normally charge several thousand dollars to cover the costs of each workshop. This level of sustained advocacy for women in Linux is only possible thanks to this generous donation.

Change is possible

We understand that raising the percentage of women in Linux is a daunting task. The invitation-only Linux Kernel Developer’s Summit, the most important Linux developer conference in the world, has a single-digit percentage of women attendees. Influential leaders make and defend disgusting insults as part of the development process, make sexist comments in talks, and argue about the definition of rape on public Linux mailing lists.

At the same time, we offer these signs of hope: as free and open sources software conferences adopted anti-harassment policies, the number of publicly reported sexist incidents dropped, from 4 incidents per year at FLOSS conferences in 2009 and 2010, to 3 per year in 2011 – 2013, and 1 in 2014 (so far). Women and genderqueer people participating in the Outreach Program for Women contributed over 1092 patches to the Linux kernel, and were the top contributors by patch count to the 3.11, 3.12, 3.13, and 3.14 kernels. The Python software community radically increased the percentage of women attending PyCon from less than 10% in 2011 to about 33% in 2014, and the percentage of women speakers went from 1% in 2010 to 33% in 2014. Change is possible; let’s get to work!

Thank you again to our anonymous $100,000 donor, and to our major individual donors from previous years: Sumana Harihareswara and Leonard Richardson, who donated $21,000 in 2012-2013, and Jesse Ruderman, who donated $5120 in 2011. Because of you, and all of our donors in the last four years, the open source software community is more diverse and welcoming than ever before – and it will keep getting better. Thank you!