Category Archives: Ada Initiative projects

Welcome to Google Montreal and Chrome, Platinum AdaCamp sponsor for 2015!

Google logo
The Ada Initiative welcomes our second Platinum sponsor of AdaCamp in 2015: Google Montreal and Chrome!

Google thrives on open source projects, like Chromium and Android, that are used by millions of people. We want those projects to be meaningful for the people who use them, so we need to include diverse perspectives in the community that builds them. We’re committed to bringing together people—in our workforce, our industry, and on the web—who have a broad range of attributes, experiences, and points of view. We believe our differences make us stronger, and produce better, more innovative work,” says Mark Larson, Engineering Director, Chrome. “Google is proud to support the work the Ada Initiative does: they help all open tech projects broaden the set of people who have a say in what we’re building.”

Google is the only sponsor who has supported every AdaCamp to date. In addition to the support of the Chrome team for the second year, AdaCamps in 2015 are supported by Google Montreal, who will host our AdaCamp Montreal reception on Sunday April 12. Thank you Google Montreal!

Note: We are deeply interested in the recent allegations of sexual harassment by a Google employee. After careful evaluation on our part, we believe that Google’s sponsorship of AdaCamp is compatible with our sponsorship policy at this time, and we welcome them as an AdaCamp sponsor. We support every Googler working for a welcoming and positive workplace.

About AdaCamp

Two women smiling

CC-BY-SA Adam Novak

AdaCamp is a conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture: open source software, Wikipedia-related projects, open data, open geo, library technology, fan fiction, remix culture, and more. AdaCamp brings women together over two days to build community, share skills, discuss problems with open tech/culture communities that affect women, and find ways to address them.

AdaCamp is the world’s only event focusing on women in open technology and culture, and is a project of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit supporting women in open technology and culture. Both are named after Countess Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. The first AdaCamp of 2015 will be held in Montreal on April 13–14, followed by events in New Zealand and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Follow Ada Initiative announcements to learn about AdaCamps near you!

Sponsorship

Your organization has the opportunity to sponsor AdaCamps in 2015 and reach women leaders in open technology and culture in three countries. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


Thank you to the AdaCamp 2015 platinum sponsors Puppet Labs and Google Montreal and Chrome; and gold sponsors The Linux Foundation and Red Hat.

Welcome to new AdaCamp 2015 sponsors: Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Simple, and Etsy

The Ada Initiative is pleased to welcome our first Gold sponsors of AdaCamp in 2015: The Linux Foundation and Red Hat!

Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the primary non-profit supporting the Linux community, including the Linux kernel, Linux conferences, and the Linux ecosystem overall. The Linux Foundation is a long-term supporter of the Ada Initiative’s work to make Linux more welcoming to women. This is the fourth year in a row that they have supported AdaCamp and we thank them for their renewed support.

Red HatRed Hat is the world’s leading provider of open source software solutions, using a community-powered approach to develop reliable and high-performing cloud, Linux, middleware, storage, and virtualization technologies. The company has more than 7,100regular, full-time associates and 80 offices in 38 countries. About 25% of Red Hat associates work remotely, and Red Hat has job opportunities around the globe. In addition to being a four-time AdaCamp sponsor, Red Hat is sponsoring the Impostor Syndrome training that will be offered at each AdaCamp in 2015.

The Ada Initiative also welcomes Bronze sponsors Simple and Etsy as supporters of AdaCamp in 2015:

simple-small-applications-whitebg

Simple‘s about making managing your personal finances effortless; it is a bank that offers all-electronic consumer banking services integrated with budgeting and savings tools. The bank, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, was founded in 2009 and partners with Bancorp Bank, an FDIC insured bank, to hold account funds.

Etsy

Etsy is a marketplace where people around the world connect, both online and offline, to make, sell and buy unique goods. Discover handmade items, vintage goods and craft supplies you can’t find anywhere else. Etsy is committed to promoting diversity in the workplace and is proud to be a B Corporation for their adherence to rigorous social and environmental standards. Etsy Engineering is also the authors of Code as Craft, a blog dedicated to writing about their craft and their collective experience building and running Etsy, the world’s most vibrant handmade marketplace.

Thank you to our four new sponsors for their support of women in open technology and culture!

About AdaCamp

Two women smiling

CC-BY-SA Adam Novak

AdaCamp is a conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture: open source software, Wikipedia-related projects, open data, open geo, library technology, fan fiction, remix culture, and more. AdaCamp brings women together over two days to build community, share skills, discuss problems with open tech/culture communities that affect women, and find ways to address them.

AdaCamp is the world’s only event focusing on women in open technology and culture, and is a project of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit supporting women in open technology and culture. Both are named after Countess Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. The first AdaCamp of 2015 will be held in Montreal on April 13–14, followed by events in New Zealand and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Follow Ada Initiative announcements to learn about AdaCamps near you!

Sponsorship

Your organization has the opportunity to sponsor AdaCamps in 2015 and reach women leaders in open technology and culture in three countries. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


Thank you to the AdaCamp 2015 platinum sponsor Puppet Labs and gold sponsors The Linux Foundation and Red Hat.

Welcome to Puppet Labs, our first Platinum AdaCamp sponsor for 2015!

Puppet Labs logo

The Ada Initiative is thrilled to welcome our first Platinum sponsor of AdaCamp in 2015: Puppet Labs! Puppet Labs is a leader in IT automation. Their software helps sysadmins automate configuration and management of machines and the software running on them.

“Ada Initiative’s mission of encouraging women to be involved with open source technology is helping to create better technology — and a better tech culture. This mission aligns with our commitment to increasing diversity and access for all, throughout the tech community. We’re proud to be Platinum sponsors of the Ada Initiative’s four AdaCamps this year.” – Luke Kanies, founder and CEO of Puppet Labs.

For our part, the Ada Initiative is proud to welcome Puppet Labs as a sponsor of AdaCamp for the third year running; their support of AdaCamp and of women in open technology and culture is crucial to our mission to change the culture for the better.

About AdaCamp

Two women smiling

CC-BY-SA Adam Novak

AdaCamp is a conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture: open source software, Wikipedia-related projects, open data, open geo, library technology, fan fiction, remix culture, and more. AdaCamp brings women together over two days to build community, share skills, discuss problems with open tech/culture communities that affect women, and find ways to address them.

AdaCamp is the world’s only event focusing on women in open technology and culture, and is a project of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit supporting women in open technology and culture. Both are named after Countess Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. The first AdaCamp of 2015 will be held in Montreal on April 13–14, followed by events in New Zealand and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Follow Ada Initiative announcements to learn about AdaCamps near you!

Sponsorship

Your organization has the opportunity to sponsor AdaCamps in 2015 and reach women leaders in open technology and culture in three countries. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


Thank you to the AdaCamp 2015 platinum sponsor Puppet Labs.

Support diversity in open source by attending an Ally Skills Workshop at PyCon 2015!

Do you think diversity in open source is important? Would you like to be part of changing the culture of open source to be more welcoming to women, newcomers, and marginalized people? You can help by attending the Ally Skills Workshop at the PyCon 2015 on Sunday April 12th, 2015 from 2pm until 5pm at the PyCon 2015 venue in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

This workshop is provided free of charge to PyCon attendees, in conjunction with AdaCamp Montreal which is co-located with PyCon 2015.

A woman explains while a man listens

Ally Skills Workshop discussion

The Ally Skills Workshop teaches men how to support women in their workplaces and communities, by effectively speaking up when they see sexism, creating discussions that allow more voices to be heard, and learning how to prevent sexism and unwelcoming behavior in the first place. The changes that reduce sexism also make communities more welcoming, productive, and creative.

Attendance at the Ally Skills Workshop is free but limited, with applications open to all registered PyCon attendees. Apply now to have the best chance to attend by filling out this Google form (or just scroll down to the form at the end of this post). We welcome participants of all genders – the best workshops have at least 20% women and genderqueer folks. You will be notified via email if we cannot fit you into the workshop. Sign up now!

Recommendations

Here are a few things people have said after attending other Ally Skills Workshops:

“We’ve run the [Ally Skills Workshop] 4 times and the impact has been fantastic. This workshop has been the catalyst for many ‘a­ha’ moments. People who understood bias exists in a very logical way, were able to see, through the conversation with peers about the very relevant scenarios, and connect emotionally with the impact bias has on the colleagues they respect and interact with daily.” – Anonymous participant

“I’ve already witnessed a couple of incidents where coworkers who attended the workshop corrected themselves after saying something that could be misconstrued.” – Anonymous participant

There’s still time to join us for AdaCamp Montreal! Apply today!

AdaCamp Montreal is only six weeks away, on Monday April 13 and Tuesday April 14!

Photograph of Lachine Canal

by Emmanuel Huybrechts CC BY

We’re excited to have already invited over a hundred people to Montreal, but we still have places left and we want to have as many women in open tech and culture have the chance to attend AdaCamp Montreal as possible. Therefore, we’ve extended our deadline for for AdaCamp Montreal and we encourage you to apply today!

If you’re a woman involved in open technology and culture, apply now to attend AdaCamp Montreal.

Past attendees of AdaCamp have included fan works creators, open mapping volunteers, open source programmers, artists, tech feminists, online activists, Wikipedia editors, and more! Do you create technology or culture and share it widely for others to reuse, remix and improve? Do you identify as a woman in a way that is significant to you? Do you work for change for women in your community and want to share strategies? AdaCamp Montreal wants you to apply!

Applications will absolutely close on Sunday, March 22, 2015 — or earlier if we fill all our spaces — so get yours in ASAP!

About AdaCamp

Five pointed star with a rainbow of colors and the word "AdaCamp"

AdaCamp is a conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture: open source software, Wikipedia-related projects, open data, open geo, library technology, fan fiction, remix culture, and more. AdaCamp brings women together over two days to build community, share skills, discuss problems with open tech/culture communities that affect women, and find ways to address them.

AdaCamp is the world’s only event focusing on women in open technology and culture, and is a project of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit supporting women in open technology and culture. Both are named after Countess Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. Attendance at AdaCamp is by invitation, with applications open to the public. Attendees will be selected based on experience in open tech/culture, experience or knowledge of feminism and advocacy, ability to collaborate with others, and any rare or notable experience or background that would add to AdaCamp.

AdaCamp Montreal will be the seventh AdaCamp, and will be held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on April 13–14, 2015, immediately following PyCon, the world’s biggest Python conference. Applications to attend AdaCamp Montreal are open until March 22, unless sold out prior.

Support diversity in Linux by attending an Ally Skills Workshop at SCALE 13x

SCALE 13x logoDo you think diversity in Linux is important? Would you like to be part of changing the culture of Linux to be more welcoming to women, newcomers, and marginalized people? You can help by attending the Ally Skills Workshop at the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE 13x) on February 20th, 2015, in Los Angeles, California, thanks to an anonymous donation of $100,000 to the Ada Initiative from a Linux kernel developer.

The Ally Skills Workshop teaches men how to support women in their workplaces and communities, by effectively speaking up when they see sexism, creating discussions that allow more voices to be heard, and learning how to prevent sexism and unwelcoming behavior in the first place. The changes that reduce sexism also make communities more welcoming, productive, and creative.

A woman explains while a man listens

Ally Skills Workshop discussion

The workshop is free of charge to all attendees of SCALE 13x with a full access pass. You can attend by signing up through the form on the event page. If you haven’t already registered for SCALE 13x, you can get a 50% discount on your full access pass with discount code ADA15, for a total price of $35 (register here).

The workshop is made possible by the generosity of an anonymous Linux kernel developer who donated $100,000 to the Ada Initiative last year in order to support women in Linux and greater diversity in open source software overall. This is only the first of four workshops we will be teaching at Linux-related conferences in 2015 at no charge to the organizers. Contact us if you would like your conference to host an Ally Skills Workshop.

Here are a few things people have said after attending other Ally Skills Workshops:

“We’ve run the [Ally Skills Workshop] 4 times and the impact has been fantastic. This workshop has been the catalyst for many ‘a­ha’ moments. People who understood bias exists in a very logical way, were able to see, through the conversation with peers about the very relevant scenarios, and connect emotionally with the impact bias has on the colleagues they respect and interact with daily.” – Anonymous participant

“I’ve already witnessed a couple of incidents where coworkers who attended the workshop corrected themselves after saying something that could be misconstrued.” – Anonymous participant

“Change is uncomfortable. This workshop helped me be comfortable about being uncomfortable. Once that is addressed it opens a path for improvement, personally and for our industry.” – Kris Amundson

You can be part of change in the Linux kernel development community! Sign up for the Ally Skills Workshop at SCALE 13x today!

Announcing AdaCamp Montreal: apply now to join us in Montreal in April!

AdaCamp Montreal est un évènement bilingue anglais/français. Pour obtenir ces informations en français, référez-vous à la page à propos d’AdaCamp. / AdaCamp Montreal is a bilingual English/French event. For a version of this information in French, see à propos d’AdaCamp.

AdaCamp is a conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture: open source software, Wikipedia-related projects, open data, open geo, library technology, fan fiction, remix culture, and more. AdaCamp brings women together over two days to build community, share skills, discuss problems with open tech/culture communities that affect women, and find ways to address them.

Photograph of Lachine Canal

Montreal, by Emmanuel Huybrechts CC BY

AdaCamp Montreal, our seventh AdaCamp, will be held in downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. on April 13th–14th, 2015, just after PyCon. The event will involve an unconference held over the two days, along with evening social events. See the website for our previous AdaCamp, AdaCamp Bangalore, to get a feel for what AdaCamp Montreal will be like.

Apply to attend AdaCamp Montreal.

AdaCamp is the world’s only event focusing on women in open technology and culture, and is a project of the Ada Initiative, a non-profit supporting women in open technology and culture. Both are named after Countess Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer. Attendance at AdaCamp is by invitation, with applications open to the public. Attendees will be selected based on experience in open tech/culture, experience or knowledge of feminism and advocacy, ability to collaborate with others, and any rare or notable experience or background that would add to AdaCamp.

Five pointed star with a rainbow of colors and the word "AdaCamp"

Travel grants for AdaCamp Montreal are available! Ask on our application form.

Application deadlines:

  • Deadline for applications requesting travel assistance: Friday February 13th, 2015
  • Final notification of acceptance for applications requesting travel assistance: Friday February 27th, 2015
  • Deadline for all other applications: Friday February 27th, 2015 or earlier depending on demand (we recommend you apply ASAP)

Sponsorships

A limited number of conference sponsorships are available. Benefits include making a public statement of your company’s values, recruiting opportunities, and reserved attendance slots for qualified employees, depending on level. Contact sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information.

Interested in attending future AdaCamps?

A record four AdaCamps are planned in 2015! In addition to AdaCamp Montreal, we plan to hold an AdaCamp in Mexico City in July co-located with Wikimania, and towards the end of 2015 we plan AdaCamps in the San Francisco Bay Area, USA; and in New Zealand.

If you would like to hear about future AdaCamps and other Ada Initiative projects, please join our mailing list for announcements.




Contact

If you have any questions, please email us at adacamp@adainitiative.org.


Thank you to the Ada Initiative’s donors for their crucial financial support of AdaCamp.

Thanks to you, 2014 was another huge year for the Ada Initiative!

Happy December! We come with good news for women in open technology and culture, and we hope you’re as happy about it as we are!

a group of AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

Since our last update in mid-2014, we announced that we are growing by hiring a new executive director, a Linux kernel contributor donated $100,000, we ran 2 more AdaCamps (for a total of 3 AdaCamps on 3 continents), and taught 9 more Ally Skills Workshops. Keep reading for more details, and thanking you for being part of another fantastic year for women in open technology and culture!

The Ada Initiative is growing! Help our search for our new Executive Director!

Valerie Aurora and Mary Gardiner founded the Ada Initiative in 2011 to increase the participation and status of women in open technology and culture. After decades of seeing volunteers burning out, they wanted to know: if we applied the feminist principle of paying people for their work to our activism, could we make more progress for women in open tech/culture? The answer: unequivocally yes!

When we reviewed our programs late this year, we realized that there was more demand for our work than we had the ability to supply. Each of our AdaCamp unconferences, held on three continents this year, sold out several weeks earlier than expected. Our Ally Skills Workshops are booked solid into 2015. And we can’t launch our standalone Impostor Syndrome Training soon enough for everyone emailing us about it!

That’s why we’ve just announced the search for our most important hire yet: a new Executive Director, who will lead the Ada Initiative as we grow to 5 – 15 staff members over the next few years. We’re so excited to meet the person who will take the Ada Initiative to the next level!

Anonymous Linux kernel contributor gives $100,000 to support women in Linux

A woman explains while a man listens

Ally Skills Workshop discussion

In mid-December, we were proud to announce that, on top of the $215,000 given by 1100 donors in our 2014 fundraising drive, a Linux kernel contributor who wishes to remain anonymous gave $100,000 to help us create a Linux community that is more diverse and more inclusive than proprietary software, not less. Linux is the world’s leading free and open source software project, and serves as a model to other open source software projects around the world.

Thanks to this donation, the Ada Initiative will be able to teach 4 Ally Skills Workshops at Linux-related conferences free of charge in 2015, and give 100 hours of free consulting to Linux-related organizations working on making the community more welcoming. If your Linux-related conference or organization is interested in either of these offers, email us at contact@adainitiative.org.

Ally Skills Workshops for all!

Our Ally Skills Workshops are going from strength to strength. Since June 2014, we have run 9 more workshops teaching over 160 people how to respond to (or prevent) sexism in their communities, including one at the Skepticon conference for skeptics and atheists. We are now scheduling Ally Skills Workshops starting in January 2015. If your organization or event is interested in an Ally Skills Workshop, email us at contact@adainitiative.org.

Three AdaCamps on three continents!

80 women cheering and wearing many different colors, CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

Happy AdaCampers!
CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin Photo

We’ve been delighted this year to gather women in open technology and culture not only in the United States, but in Germany and India too! Learn more about our 2014 AdaCamps in the post-event reports for AdaCamp Portland, AdaCamp Berlin, and AdaCamp Bangalore!

And keep an eye out for the of our 2015 locations, coming soon!

Pssst, don’t tell anyone who hasn’t read this in a public blog post and widely distributed email but we think we can say this: we’re working to bring AdaCamp to Montréal just after a certain major programming language conference in April! Later in the year, we’re hoping to announce AdaCamps in Central America, the US West Coast and Australia/New Zealand. Stay tuned for announcements!

Supporting our work in 2015

SoManyShirts

2015 will be another huge leap forward for the Ada Initiative and women in open technology and culture. We’re shortly announcing 2015’s AdaCamps and the availability of our Impostor Syndrome training workshops, with more to come!

Your end of year gift will let us provide low-cost tickets and travel grants to AdaCampers, develop Ally Skills and Impostor Syndrome training materials and provide free consulting to open technology and culture programs and events on how to include women contributors.

And if you donate $256 (or $20 monthly) before January 1, we will give you one of our beautiful “Not Afraid to Say the F-word: Feminism” t-shirts!

Donate now

If you’ve donated already in 2014, you can still help out: your employer’s matching program just might double your donationOur donation FAQ has the info your employer may need to match your gift. You often need to make a matching requests soon after the year ends, so check your employer’s program today.

We hope you’re looking forward to finding out what 2015 holds as much as we are!

For those of you making end-of-year donations to charity, the Ada Initiative is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) non-profit. Your donation may be tax-deductible in the U.S. For general information, see our donation FAQ, but please ask your tax advisor for individual advice.

AdaCamp Bangalore: “Nothing could be more open and encouraging than this”

I can say this conference was the most truly touched feminist endeavor I have ever witnessed or thought of. An inspiration to last through. — Rupali Talwatkar

Group shot of AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

AdaCamp is an unconference for women in open technology and culture and the people who support them. AdaCamp brings women together to build community, discuss issues women have in common across open technology and culture fields and find ways to address them. AdaCamp is organized by the Ada Initiative, a non-profit devoted to increasing the participation and status of women in open technology and culture, which includes open source software, Wikipedia and related projects, fan culture and more.

50 people who identified as women attended AdaCamp Bangalore, held on November 22-23, 2014 at Red Hat in Bangalore.

A huge thank you to all of our sponsors who made AdaCamp Bangalore possible:
Google, Puppet Labs, Ada Initiative donors, Automattic, Mozilla, Red Hat, Web We Want, Wikimedia Foundation, Simple, New Relic, Wikimedia Deutschland, Linux Foundation, MongoDB, NetApp, Rackspace, Spotify, Stripe, Wikimedia UK, Gitlab, OCLC, O’Reilly, Pinboard and Python.

Impact of AdaCamp Bangalore

Our post-event survey (24% response rate) indicated that 92% of respondents had improved their professional networks and feel more part of a community of women in open technology andculture. 92% also felt that they gained a better understanding of issues facing women in open technology and culture.

AdaCamp logo

75% agreed that AdaCamp increased their commitment to participating in open technology and culture in future. 67% of respondents also said that they learned new skills to participate in open technology and culture.

Motivating women who want to edit Wikipedia and helping them get rid of the same inhibitions that I had early this year when I started editing Wikipedia was a great feeling. We had two women published their first articles on Wikipedia and we were so proud. — Parul Thakur

Survey respondents mentioned some highlights of the event including the range of topics covered, the impostor syndrome workshop which opened the camp on Saturday, and the thoughtful provision of a “quiet room” for people to take some time out.

About the attendees

50 people attended AdaCamp Bangalore. A large majority of attendees came from locations across India, while we also had attendees from the United Arab Emirates, Myanmar, the United States, Canada, and Australia.

a group of AdaCamp Bangalore attendees

We worked hard to make AdaCamp Bangalore diverse in many different ways. Some statistics from our post-conference survey (24% response rate):

  • Ten different languages were listed as people’s “first language”, including Kannada, Malayalam, Hindi, Tamil, Bengali, Malagasy, Malathi, Sanskrit, French and English.
  • 100% of survey respondents listed their race or ethnicity as something other than white or Caucasian (compared to 6% in the AdaCamp Berlin survey, 23% in the AdaCamp Portland survey, 30% in the AdaCamp San Francisco survey and 25% in the AdaCamp DC survey)
  • 100% were born outside the United States (100% AdaCamp Berlin, 11% AdaCamp Portland, 18% AdaCamp San Francisco, 28% AdaCamp DC)
  • 33% were students, and 83% of survey respondents were not employed as programmers or IT specialists (50% AdaCamp Berlin, 42% AdaCamp Portland, 41% AdaCamp San Francisco, 49% AdaCamp DC)

a bar chart displaying the diversity statistics mentioned above

Travel scholarships

To make AdaCamp more accessible to students, non-profit employees and others living outside of Bangalore, and to increase the diversity of our attendees, we offered six travel scholarships to AdaCamp Bangalore, funded by the Wikimedia Foundation and Google. Three of these went to attendees from more distant parts of India, and the others went to AdaCampers from Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and the US. Mozilla additionally provided travel funding to five attendees from within their community, and Wikimedia India to one from their community; all these came from within India, where long distances between cities can make travel expensive for attendees.

What we did

AdaCamp Bangalore was primarily structured as an unconference, with attendee-organized and facilitated sessions around issues facing women in open technology and culture. However, unlike most unconferences, we also provide some plenary sessions to help orient attendees, and session curation to make the two days flow more smoothly.

For most attendees, the first session of AdaCamp was an Impostor Syndrome workshop. Women’s socialization is often less confident and competitive than men’s, and women are therefore especially vulnerable to Impostor Syndrome — the belief that one’s work is inferior and one’s achievements and recognition are fraudulent — in open technology and culture endeavors where public scrutiny of their work is routine. Our Saturday morning impostor syndrome workshop was led by Ada Initiative advisor Sumana Harihareswara.

Attendees looking at a laptop

Following this, we had sessions introducing attendees to a range of different areas of open technology, culture and feminism. These allow attendees to have a better understanding of the range of open communities, before going in-depth in later sessions. At AdaCamp Bangalore, our four introductory sessions were on Wikipedia, Online Privacy and Security, Open Access to research materials, and Intersectional Feminism.

Two sessions on Saturday afternoon were the first free-form sessions: the first focusing on what problems and barriers face women in open source technology and culture; and the second discussing existing solutions in a variety of communities. On Sunday the morning sessions were also free-form, continuing the discussion of existing solutions and developing new solutions to support and increase the participation of women in open technology and culture.

On Sunday afternoon, attendee-organized sessions moved towards skill-sharing and creation, with a varity of workshops, including a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, an open hardware workshop introducing participants to Arduino and RaspberryPi, an in-depth security workshop and a hands-on introduction to Mozilla Webmaker.

AdaCamp Bangalore schedule, made of coloured paper stuck to the wall

It was hard to believe that a completely unscheduled conference had such an awesome program made by the attendees in just 30 minutes. Nothing could be more open and encouraging than this. — Rupali Talwatkar

AdaCampers reported learning a variety of new skills including but not limited to editing Wikipedia, building mashups, entrepreneurship, filing bugs, workshop facilitiation, and reported that they learned about subjects like Open Street Maps, Google Summer of Code, Gnome OPW, augmented reality, Arduino and Mozilla Webmaker. Attendees also noted that the related discussions in our attendee forums, after the event, provided them with further valuable information.

Lightning talks were held on both days of the main track. Any AdaCamper that wanted to share their knowledge, experience or passion—on a topic either in open technology and culture or not—was given the stage for 90 seconds. AdaCampers talked about subjects from local Indian projects addressing women’s issues, open humanitarian projects, women’s free software groups and building a library of open knowledge for students in Myanmar. For many lightning talk speakers, this was their first experience of public speaking.

Social events

On the evening of Friday November 21, Web We Want sponsored a reception at Red Hat’s offices. Thank you to Red Hat and Web We Want for hosting a reception that allowed a wider group to get together and socialise in a positive, feminist atmosphere.

Following the tradition established at many previous AdaCamps, instead of a large social event on Saturday night, attendees had dinner in small groups at restaurants around Bangalore. Attendees were invited to host dinners on behalf of their employers. Thank you to the Centre for Internet and Society, Growstuff and their representatives, for hosting dinners.

Reports from AdaCampers

“All and all a really fabulous and productive day; spent meeting some amazing women, learning lots which is sparking some ideas for some future projects.” — Tracey Benson

Several AdaCampers wrote publicly about their experiences at the event. You can read some of those blogs posts here:

Conference resources

AdaCamp lanyards in red, yellow, and green with patterns for colorblind visibility

AdaCamp lanyards. CC BY-SA Jenna Saint Martin
Photo

Each AdaCamp we strive to improve the event. After each AdaCamp, we publish any resources we developed and license them CC BY-SA for use by the community. We’re presently working on a photography usage policy and an alcohol policy, which we look forward to releasing publicly in the new year!

“Though I already had a good idea of what to expect, I was still impressed with the meticulous effort AdaCamp invests in creating a safe and comfortable experience for everyone.” — Karolle Rabarison

Future AdaCamps

We’re thrilled with the increasing success of AdaCamp at bringing women together and developing the current and next generation of women leaders in open technology and culture. AdaCamp is one of the key events of the Ada Initiative, with huge impact on its attendees and the communities they are involved in. Our 2014 AdaCamps in Portland, Oregon, USA; Berlin, Germany; and Bangalore, India, are part of our strategy to reach a wider range of women by holding more frequent but smaller AdaCamps around the world. We are developing plans for AdaCamps in 2015 and 2016 now. If you’d like to be notified of the next AdaCamp, sign up to our announcement mailing list or follow us on Twitter.

Thank you to all of the AdaCamp Bangalore attendees and AdaCamp sponsors for giving us the support we needed to run this event and make it what it is. You are what makes AdaCamp a success!

Your organization has the opportunity to sponsor AdaCamps in 2015 and reach women leaders in open technology and culture. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


Thank you again to the AdaCamp 2014 platinum sponsors Google, Puppet Labs and Ada Initiative donors; gold sponsors Automattic, Red Hat, Mozilla, Web We Want and Wikimedia Foundation; and silver sponsors New Relic, Simple and Wikimedia Deutschland.

AdaCamp Berlin report-out: “I went to AdaCamp and all I got was a very good time!”

“Thanks to all of you! it was a great experience that all women in tech and open culture should live.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

AdaCamp is an unconference for women in open technology and culture and the people who support them. AdaCamp brings women together to build community, discuss issues women have in common across open technology and culture fields, and find ways to address them. AdaCamp is organized by the Ada Initiative, a non-profit devoted to increasing the participation and status of women in open technology and culture, which includes open source software, Wikipedia and related projects, fan fiction, and more.

57 people who identified as women attended AdaCamp Berlin, held on October 11-12, 2014 at the office of Wikimedia Deutschland.

AdaCamp

A huge thank you to all of our sponsors who made AdaCamp Berlin possible:
Google, Puppet Labs, Ada Initiative donors, Automattic, Mozilla, Red Hat, Web We Want, Wikimedia Foundation, Simple, New Relic, Wikimedia Deutschland, Linux Foundation, NetApp, Rackspace, Spotify, Stripe, Wikimedia UK, MongoDB, Gitlab, OCLC, O’Reilly, Pinboard, and Python Software Foundation.

Impact of AdaCamp Berlin

“Talking to feminist women who work in tech and don’t do exactly the same things I do gave me the possibility of looking at my position from other points of view and this was very empowering.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

Our post-event survey (24% response rate) indicated that 83% respondents had improved their professional networks and feel more committed to participating in open technology and culture as a result of AdaCamp, two of the primary goals of the event. 66% of respondents felt more part of a community of women in open technology and culture and 58% agreed that AdaCamp increased their awareness of issues facing women in open technology and culture.

“I got back to editing Wikipedia after being dormant for 3 years.” — Ednah Kiome

62% of respondents also said that they learned new skills to participate in open technology and culture. Overall, survey respondents liked the unconference format for its attendee-driven content and collaborative nature. Many participants specifically praised AdaCamp’s role cards that are used for all sessions to help keep the session focused, on topic, and productive.

About the attendees

AdaCamp Berlin Attendees

CC BY-SA Sarah Sharp

“She believed, she could, so she did.”Greta Doci

57 people attended AdaCamp Berlin. The attendees came from 19 countries. 35% of attendees were from Germany and 13% were from the United Kingdom. Other countries represented include Albania, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, France, Ireland, Italy, Kenya, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

We worked hard to make AdaCamp Berlin diverse in many different ways. Some statistics from our post-conference survey (24% response rate):

  • 9% listed their race or ethnicity as other than white or Caucasian (compared to 23% in the Adacamp Portland survey, 30% in the AdaCamp San Francisco survey and 25% in the AdaCamp DC survey)
  • 100% were born outside the United States (11% AdaCamp Portland, 18% AdaCamp San Francisco, 28% AdaCamp DC)
  • 50% were not employed as programmers or IT specialists (42% AdaCamp Portland, 41% AdaCamp San Francisco, 49% AdaCamp DC)

Travel scholarships

Inclusivity was a founding cornerstone of the event.”Zara Rahman

To make AdaCamp more accessible to students, non-profit employees and others living outside of Berlin, and to increase the diversity of our attendees, we offered 6 travel scholarships to AdaCamp Berlin. Two of the travel grants were awarded to AdaCampers from Albania, and the others were awarded to AdaCampers from Belgium, France, Kenya and Slovenia. An additional 5 travel grants were provided by Wikimedia UK for UK based attendees. These five AdaCampers came from the United Kingdom and from Ireland.

What we did

AdaCamp Berlin was primarily structured as an unconference, with attendee-organized and facilitated sessions around issues facing women in open technology and culture. Based on feedback from the previous four AdaCamps, we added some more structure to the beginning and end of the schedule.

“I loved that AdaCamp allowed us to talk about [the connections between basic rights for women, and empowerment through technology] in their interlinked realities, unlike the slew of women’s events that seem to do little more than feed corporate ambitions.” — Jane Ruffino

For most attendees, the first session of AdaCamp was an Impostor Syndrome workshop. Women’s socialization is often less confident and competitive than men’s, and women are therefore especially vulnerable to Impostor Syndrome — the belief that one’s work is inferior and one’s achievements and recognition are fraudulent — in open technology and culture endeavors where public scrutiny of their work is routine. As at AdaCamp San Francisco, the opening session was a large-group Impostor Syndrome workshop facilitated by AdaCamp Berlin and Bangalore lead Alex Bayley. The Impostor Syndrome workshop was followed by introductory sessions on areas of open technology and culture that might be new to participants; including everything from electronic security and privacy, to feminist activism.

Two sessions in the afternoon were the first free-form sessions: the first focusing on what problems and barriers face women in open source technology and culture; and the second discussing existing solutions in a variety of communities. On Sunday the morning sessions were also free-form, with a focus on generating new and creative ways to address the problems and barriers facing women in open source technology and culture.

AdaCamp Schedule

CC BY-SA Nóirín Plunkett

On Sunday afternoon, attendee-organized sessions moved towards skill-sharing and creation, with a multitude of workshops, make-a-thons, edit-a-thons, hack-a-thons, and tutorials that ranged from a security and cryptography workshop, through group programming working on software as a craft, to a meta-workshop on how to run workshops!

AdaCampers reported learning a variety of new skills including but not limited to the usage of crypto tools, privacy, approaches to feminism, how to contribute to open source, how to better organize events, creating safer spaces, making events inclusive, fan culture, security and what one AdaCamper described as “A deeper understanding of why security is particularly important for women.”

Lightning talks were held on both days of the main track. Any AdaCamper that wanted to share their knowledge, experience or passion—on a topic either in open technology and culture or not—was given the stage for 90 seconds. AdaCampers talked about subjects from useful hand signals for group communication, to online language barriers, to Wikipedia projects. For many lightning talk speakers, this was their first experience of public speaking.

Social events

On the evening of Friday October 10, Wikimedia UK and Web We Want sponsored a reception at Wikimedia Deutschland. Thank you to Wikimedia UK and Web We Want for hosting a reception that allowed a wider group to get together and socialise in a positive, feminist atmosphere.

3 women smiling

CC BY-SA Greta Doci


Following the tradition established at AdaCamps DC, San Francisco, and Portland; instead of a large social event on Saturday night, attendees had dinner in small groups at restaurants around Berlin. Attendees were invited to host dinners on behalf of their employers. Thank you to Puppet Labs and Knight-Mozilla OpenNews and their representatives, for hosting dinners.

“The greatest moments [of AdaCamp] were the session on women who don’t code and the Saturday night dinner, developing a discussion on codes of conduct at feminist events we’d begun during the afternoon with some of the women who attended it and luckily were also at the dinner.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

Reports from AdaCampers

“I went to AdaCamp and all I got was a very good time!” — Helga Hansen

Several AdaCampers wrote publicly about their experiences at the event, in a variety of languages! You can read some of those blogs posts here:

Conference resources

Colored lanyards to indicate photo preferences

CC BY-SA Ioana Chiorean


Each AdaCamp we strive to improve the event. After each AdaCamp, we publish any resources we developed and license them CC BY-SA for use by the community. We’re presently working on a photography usage policy, which we look forward to releasing publicly in the new year!

Future AdaCamps

We’re thrilled with the increasing success of AdaCamp at bringing women together and developing the current and next generation of women leaders in open technology and culture. AdaCamp is one of the key events of the Ada Initiative, with huge impact on its attendees and the communities they are involved in. Our 2014 AdaCamps in Portland, Oregon, USA; Berlin, Germany; and Bangalore, India, are part of our strategy to reach a wider range of women by holding more frequent but smaller AdaCamps around the world. We are developing plans for AdaCamps in 2015 and 2016 now. If you’d like to be notified of the next AdaCamp, sign up to our announcement mailing list or follow us on Twitter.

Thank you to all of the AdaCamp Berlin attendees and AdaCamp sponsors for giving us the support we needed to run this event and make it what it is. You are what makes AdaCamp a success!

Your organization has the opportunity to sponsor AdaCamps in 2015 and reach women leaders in open technology and culture. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


Thank you again to the AdaCamp 2014 platinum sponsors Google and Puppet Labs, gold sponsors Automattic, Red Hat, Mozilla, Web We Want, and Wikimedia Foundation; and silver sponsors New Relic, Simple and Wikimedia Deutschland.