Tag Archives: adacamp sf

Another way to attract women to conferences: photography policies

There is plenty of evidence that quite a few women conference-goers don’t like being photographed at conferences, especially when they aren’t asked first. Conference goers report stealth photography, sometimes using telephoto lenses to get close-up photos without the subject’s knowledge. Sometimes they are photographed against their will, such as photographers who continued taking more pictures even when directly told to stop. Some geek events have even had upskirt photography, shots down the front of women’s shirts, and similar problems.

Camera with large lens

CC-BY potzuyoko on Flickr

The Ada Initiative recently asked women about their experiences with conference photography. Women reported that photography made it difficult to avoid letting stalkers or abusers knowing where they are, such as abusive parents or ex-partners. Some women experienced trolling, harassment and death threats triggered by new photos of themselves appearing online. Several women even have a dedicated group of stalkers who edit any new photo of themselves to sexually humiliate or threaten them. Other women are merely tired of being photographed like rare zoo animals, or their photos being used to promote conferences without their permission. More information on why some women dislike photography at geek events can be found on the Geek Feminism Wiki.

As a result, some women avoid or do not attend conferences where they can’t opt out of photography or recording. That’s why at all three AdaCamps to date, our photography policy is that permission to photograph attendees must be explicitly given. At AdaCamp San Francisco, our photography and recording policy was:

Do not photograph, video, or audio record anyone at AdaCamp without their express permission, sought in advance. Most attendees will have different colored badge lanyards showing their preference for photography:

Piles of lanyards in each of red, yellow and green. By Flore Allemandou CC BY-SA.

AdaCamp SF lanyards, by Flore Allemandou CC BY-SA

  • Green: Photographs always okay
  • Yellow: Ask before photographing
  • Red: Photographs never okay, don’t ask

There is no prior opt-into audio or video recording, you must always ask before recording.

Initially we used coloured stickers on badges to indicate preference, but they are much harder for photographers to see clearly and made some photographers give up entirely. Wide badge lanyards can be seen from all directions from a long way away. We are happy to say that we had no complaints about the difficulty of photography at this year’s AdaCamp. We still need to devise a back-up signal for people without the ability to see the difference in the colours. Some suggestions include creating different patterns on each lanyard: Plain for yes, dots for maybe, striped for no.

Photograph of Jen Mei Wu, seated

AdaCamper Jen Mei Wu wearing a green lanyard, by Sarah Sharp

We recommend that other conferences adopt a photography policy that is not an automatic or default opt-in. Policies vary a lot, and sometimes include exceptions for group shots. What we like about the AdaCamp policy is that it is clear and unambiguous, not requiring any judgement calls about whether something is a group or individual photograph or similar. It has the additional advantage of not requiring people who never want to be photographed to opt-out over and over.

Other conferences with different photography policies include:

  • Open Source Bridge, which allows photography as long the subject knows they are being photographed, they haven’t opted out, and any photographs are deleted upon request
  • WisCon, which allows video and audio recording and photography for personal archival use only unless an attendee opts out. It includes a suggestion to ask first, and a requirement to ask subjects before making an upload to a commercial website
  • Sirens, which requests that photographers ask before photographing attendees, and bans photography during programmed sessions unless the program information says otherwise
  • Con Carolinas, which requests that photographers ask attendees before photographing them, other than incidental appearances in a crowd shot

Photography at conferences may seem totally innocuous to most people, but when you ask women about their experiences, you can see how uncomfortable and even dangerous it can be. For some women, going to a conference without a photography policy means being photographed incessantly, a resurgence in online harassment and death threats, a dangerous stalker showing up at her hotel room, or pornographic photos taken against her will and posted online. Even without all these consequences, asking permission to take photos and post them online is just plain good manners.

Licence exemption: the photograph of Jen Mei Wu, used here with permission, is not covered by the Creative Commons licence for this post. Please visit the Flickr page for the photograph for information on re-using this image.

Kicking impostor syndrome in the head: lessons from AdaCamp DC and SF

Impostor syndrome is a common reaction to doing publicly visible and publicly criticised work like that done in open technology and culture; it’s a feeling that you haven’t earned and aren’t qualified for the status you or your work have and a fear of failing publicly and being discovered to be an impostor. It is very prevalent among women in the space, many of whom have been socialised to value other’s opinion of their work above their own, and to do things “by the book”.

At the Ada Initiative’s AdaCamp, impostor syndrome is such a popular topic of discussion that five sessions ran on it at AdaCamp DC in July 2012. More recently at AdaCamp San Francisco Leigh Honeywell ran an opening session for most conference attendees on combating impostor syndrome.

Video: Denise Paolucci, “Overcoming Impostor Syndrome”

As a result of the AdaCamp DC discussions, at linux.conf.au 2013 in January Ada Initiative board member and Dreamwidth Studios co-founder Denise Paolucci gave a talk on Overcoming Impostor Syndrome, sharing the strategies that were discussed at AdaCamp DC. Denise’s talk has great strategies for both sufferers of impostor syndrome and for allies and leaders to help people realistically judge their own work and to seek help and support when they need it.

Talk transcript at the bottom of the post.

Denise’s talk also appeared recently at Open Source Bridge in Portland.

Values exercise: Leigh Honeywell

At AdaCamp San Francisco, one of Leigh Honeywell’s exercises for participants was based on the hypothesis that impostor syndrome is a manifestation of stereotype threat — the tendency of people to perform in ways that confirm stereotypes of groups they identify with, such as women performing worse on a math test if its mentioned that the test is looking for gender differences in performance — and had participants perform a values exercise that they can use before doing something like writing a resume or taking a test.

Leigh’s exercise is based on Miyake et al’s finding that writing about one’s values helps combat stereotype threat. Participants identify five values (from a list including examples such as Decisiveness, Pleasure, Self-reliance and Wisdom) that are important to them, and write about one value. The worksheet also asks them to describe a time when they were asked for advice, ie treated as an expert. With this short, simple exercise, participants are primed for a more realistic, positive assessment of their own ability and achievements.

Leigh has released the values worksheet under Creative Commons Attribution, and welcomes contributions.

Talk transcript: Denise Paolucci, “Overcoming Impostor Syndrome”

This talk transcript is based on the caption file for the video of Denise’s talk, prepared by Mirabai Knight of StenoKnight CART Services.

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AdaCamp San Francisco final report: "It was an amazing, inspirational weekend for me."

“I enjoyed being part of a discussion that others were as passionate about as I was.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

Photograph of the San Francisco cityscape

by Glen Scarborough, CC BY-SA

AdaCamp is an unconference for women and female-identified people in open technology and culture and the people who support them. AdaCamp brings women together to build community, discuss issues women have in common across open technology and culture fields, and find ways to address them. AdaCamp is organized by the Ada Initiative, a non-profit devoted to increasing the participation and status of women in open technology and culture, which includes open source software, Wikipedia and related projects, fan fiction, and more.

Nearly 180 people attended the main track of AdaCamp San Francisco, held on June 8–9, 2013, with an additional 15 attending an allies track on June 8 open to participants of any gender.

A huge thank you to all of our sponsors who made AdaCamp SF possible: Mozilla, Automattic, Google Site Reliability Engineering, Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, Puppet Labs, Twitter, GitHub, Heroku, O’Reilly, New Relic and the Python Software Foundation.

Impact of AdaCamp San Francisco

AdaCamp logo

“People with knowledge — especially more technical knowledge were able to share it.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

Our post-event survey (31% response rate) indicated that a large majority (92%) of respondents felt that AdaCamp had improved their professional networks and nearly as many (82%) felt more part of a community of women in open technology and culture. Two of the primary goals of AdaCamp are to increase awareness of issues facing women in open technology and culture (87% of respondents agree that AdaCamp had this effect) and to help women participate in open technology and culture (85% of respondents agree that they are more committed to participating now).

Many survey respondents enjoyed the variety of topics at AdaCamp; their control over the topics; the freedom to move between discussions; and the diversity of people involved in the discussions and the resulting different perspectives.

About the attendees

“The unconference was stronger because we weren’t all alike” — Christina

179 people attended the main track for people who identified as women or female, with a further 15 attending the allies track for people of any gender. These attendees lived in at least nine countries. The majority of our attendees were from the United States, other AdaCampers traveled from Canada, Mexico, Cambodia, China, India, Romania, Cuba and Australia.

We worked hard to make AdaCamp SF diverse in many different ways. Some statistics from our post-conference survey (31% response rate):

  • 30% listed their race or ethnicity as other than white or Caucasian (25% in the AdaCamp DC survey)
  • 18% were born outside the United States (28% AdaCamp DC)
  • 16% spoke a language other than English as their first language (19% AdaCamp DC)
  • 41% were not employed as programmers or IT specialists (49% AdaCamp DC)
  • 26% were students, professors or researchers (22% AdaCamp DC)

Travel scholarships

To make AdaCamp more accessible to students, non-profit employees and others living outside of the Bay Area, and to increase the diversity of our attendees, we offered 16 travel scholarships to AdaCamp San Francisco. Our two international grants were awarded to AdaCampers from India and Cambodia, and our fourteen North American travel grants were awarded to eleven AdaCampers from the United States, two from Mexico and one from Canada.

What we did

Main track

“No matter what interest people had, they were able to gain respect by sharing their knowledge.” — Anonymous AdaCamper

AdaCamp San Francisco’s main track was primarily structured as an unconference, with attendee-organised and facilitated sessions around issues facing women in open technology and culture. However, following feedback from the previous two AdaCamps, we added some more structure to the beginning and end of the schedule.

For most attendees, the first session of AdaCamp’s main track was an Imposter Syndrome workshop. Women’s socialisation is often less confident and competitive than men’s, and women are therefore especially vulnerable to Impostor Syndrome — the belief that one’s work is inferior and one’s achievements and recognition are fraudulent — in open technology and culture endeavours where public scrutiny of their work is routine. At AdaCamp DC Impostor Syndrome discussion had been popular enough to appear in four different timeslots, so at AdaCamp San Francisco, the opening session was a large-group Imposter Syndrome workshop faciliated by Ada Initiative advisor Leigh Honeywell. Leigh has opened one of the exercises from the workshop for public contributions.

During this first session, other AdaCampers went to assist with the Allies Workshop in the allies track, and others focussed on advanced discussion around intersectionality. The Imposter Syndrome workshop was followed by introductory sessions on areas of open technology and culture that might be new to participants; including open source, fandom, Wikipedia and open science.

Two sessions in the afternoon were the first free-form sessions. A discussion on the “Likeability Paradox” was highlighted by many attendees as one of their favourite sessions. Others included discussion of the mythos surrounding Ada Lovelace as a historical figure; journalism and tech; diversity beyond gender; and depression in activists. On Sunday the morning sessions were also free-form, and included womyn of color; motherhood and feminism in tech; job seeking and career advice; and being feminine or expressing femininity in technical spaces.

“[I admired] the impressive skills of some of the younger women coming into the tech world” — Anonymous AdaCamper

On Sunday afternoon, attendee-organized sessions moved towards skill-sharing and creation, including an HTML5 workshop; a Python tutorial; a make-a-thon and a Wikipedia edit-a-thon. Discussion continued on topics including ageism; data, women and environmentalism; human rights and open tech; and when one is able to identify as a core contributor in open tech.

Lightning talks were held on both days of the main track, on topics ranging from mentoring to Nethack to product localization.

Allies track

A one day allies track for people of any gender wishing to support women in open technology and culture was held on June 8. The allies track opened with Ada Initiative Executive Director Valerie Aurora faciliating the Ada Initiative allies workshop, which focuses on practical, everyday ways allies can support women in their community. The allies subsequently organised a one-track unconference around themes they chose.

Social events

On the evening of Friday June 7, Google SRE hosted a reception for main track attendees at their San Francisco offices. Thank you to Google for sharing their beautiful view of the Bay Bridge with us, and to Matt Howard for organising the event and Sabrina Farmer for her welcome to attendees.

Following the tradition established at AdaCamp DC, instead of a large social event on Saturday night, attendees had dinner in small groups at restaurants around San Francisco. Attendees were invited to host dinners on behalf of their employers; thank you to Intel, Puppet Labs, Mozilla, Google, Red Hat, Benetech, the Wikimedia Foundation and Suspect Devices, and their representatives, for hosting dinners.

Reports from AdaCampers

Several AdaCampers have written publicly about the event, describing their favourite parts and suggesting improvements for future events. Thank you for your feedback, and we hope others find it as useful as we did! (Emphasis in the quotes is ours.)

Hung out and talked with SO MANY PEOPLE. Great conversations about mapping, the Hate Map, Open Street Map, open source hardware kits for fiber arts people, web accessibility struggles in open source, all kinds of gossip, new feminist hackerspaces starting up like the Seattle Attic and one coming soon in Portland (there may be an SF one someday … stay tuned). Ciberseguridad in Mexico for feminist activists, scooters…. I can’t remember what else but I was never bored for even a second. Everyone was so nerdy and happy. I can’t wait for tomorrow!
Liz Henry, reception report

I got to meet some really amazing women this weekend. As much as I love working with my amazing male colleagues, there is always something different about being able to sit down with other women who have shared the experiences that are often difficult to explain to people who haven’t had them. Even better, many discussions I had were advice and solution-driven, “I had $foo experience, here’s how I handled it.” Awesome.
Elizabeth Krumbach

In the book Lean In, there’s a section about the difficulty of being liked vs being respected when you are a woman leader. This discussion was by far the best large-group of the day for me, and extremely well-moderated. I wrote down lots of phrases: bossy, “risk theater”, damning with faint praise… There was the start of a great discussion about dog whistle adjectives, adverbs and verbs that subtly and not-so-subtly remind women of their role and place.
Selena Deckelmann (see also her reception report)

We said many things [during the “Startups” session], but the one that stayed with me was reminding ourselves it is never too late to start. You can succeed even If you did not start your learning/business/start-up before you reached your early 20s. And it is very possible that you will accomplish many victories, since you already have experience in many other fields.
Andrea Arzaba

I met many, many amazing women of all ages from all walks of life who are doing amazing things… but for now want to express how thankful I am for the opportunity to attend. AdaCamp was an inspiring experience which I won’t soon forget.
Emily Gonyer

Ranging from open education to open government, learning python to open hardware, work cultures for women, to women centric maker spaces (the one I really wanted to be a part of); the range was broad and exciting. I proposed two sessions: on angry young women, and on women centric maker spaces. A fun session where I learned things: soft circuits (and e-textile – with no stereotypes attached :P )
Noopur Raval

The sessions were amazing but even more amazing were the AdaCampers themselves. I met strong, capable, brilliant people who have passion for a variety of things but who were all brought together to participate in this unique event. They each brought their own experiences and their own expertise. The unconference was stronger because we weren’t all alike and we didn’t experience things in the same way.
Christina

I can’t sum up my conference experience easily, but it was powerful on various levels. This is the first time they’ve had an “ally track”–apparently in the previous two conferences, there were some issues with even well-intended men changing the tone significantly… so the allies track was something of an experiment. For me, at least, it was a hugely successful experiment… I was pleasantly surprised by… [h]ow many folks there who were not only highly motivated and passionate about open source, but were equally as motivated to change open source tech environments so that they are more diverse — not only along gender lines, but also around race, class, queerness, etc.
Jeff Pollett, allies track attendee

Conference resources

After AdaCamp DC, we released our conference booklet and associated materials to help build safe events for women. Following AdaCamp SF, we will also be releasing some accessibility techniques we used to make the conference more accessible to wheelchair users and people with visually impairments, together with further discussion of photography policies for conferences.

Future AdaCamps

“Please have it again and again and again. Everywhere. Thank you!” — Anonymous AdaCamper

We’re thrilled with the increasing success of AdaCamp at bringing women together and developing the current and next generation of women leaders in open technology and culture. AdaCamp is one of the key programs of the Ada Initiative, with huge impact on its attendees and the communities they are involved in. We are developing plans for AdaCamps in 2014 and 2015; if you’d like to be notified of the next AdaCamp, sign up to our announcement mailing list or follow us on Twitter.

Thank you to all of the AdaCamp SF attendees and AdaCamp SF sponsors for giving us the support we needed to run this event and make it what it is. You’re the reason AdaCamp is amazing!


We thank our gold level sponsors Mozilla, Automattic and Google Site Reliability Engineering; and our silver level sponsors Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, and Puppet Labs; for their support of AdaCamp San Francisco.

New Relic sponsors AdaCamp San Francisco

New Relic logoThe Ada Initiative is pleased to welcome New Relic as the newest sponsor of AdaCamp San Francisco, our conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture. New Relic is the third AdaCamp supporting sponsor.

New Relic makes tools that allow developers of web and mobile apps to monitor and analyze the performance of their applications, all the way from user experience, through servers, and down to the line of application code. New Relic’s monitoring tools and platform support Ruby, PHP, .Net, Java, Python, iOS, and Android apps. New Relic has offices in Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle, and they are hiring! See New Relic’s list of job openings to learn more.

On behalf of women in open technology and culture, we thank New Relic for their generous support.

Why AdaCamp?

Women in open tech/culture

Women in open tech/culture

Why is AdaCamp so important to women in open technology and culture? Because AdaCamp measurably increases women’s participation in open technology and culture – in an environment that more often pushes women towards the door.

Most women who attend AdaCamp “lean in” to their careers and community work after AdaCamp. In our post-conference survey, 92% of survey respondents said AdaCamp increased their commitment to open technology and culture.

AdaCamp also increases women’s professional connections: 100% of survey respondents said AdaCamp increased their network in open tech/culture. Several AdaCamp attendees landed new jobs in open tech/culture through the connections they made at AdaCamp, and at least two won prestigious internships with Code for America and the GNOME Outreach Program for Women. One of the benefits of attending AdaCamp is joining the AdaCamp alumni mailing list, which members use to recruit job applicants, advertise events, and share career advice.

AdaCampers learn new skills at AdaCamp as well. Past AdaCamps included tutorials in Wikipedia editing, Python programming, and other open tech/culture topics. The tutorials were so popular that we are expanding them this year, and adding a “hackathon” (for all open tech/culture projects, not just coding).

Applications to AdaCamp are now closed.

Sponsorship

Your organization has the opportunity to join Automattic in sponsoring AdaCamp San Francisco, and reach 250 women leaders and future leaders in open technology and culture. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.


We thank our gold level sponsors Mozilla, Automattic and Google Site Reliability Engineering; and our silver level sponsors Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, and Puppet Labs; for their support of AdaCamp San Francisco.

AdaCamp San Francisco applications closing tomorrow (May 6)!

Seven women with arms on each others' shoulders

Happy AdaCampers

Tomorrow is the final day for applications to attend AdaCamp San Francisco! If you want to be part of this fun and exciting event for women in open technology and culture (and their supporters), you should apply now. The AdaCamp San Francisco main track will be June 8–9, 2013 (Saturday and Sunday), with the allies track on June 8.

Here’s a few of our success stories:

We especially encourage applications from people living in the San Francisco Bay area who could not otherwise afford to travel to AdaCamp. AdaCamp registration fees vary from $0 to $250, depending on financial need, so if you can get to downtown San Francisco, you can afford to attend!

Joseph Reagle and Christine Spang in discussion at AdaCamp DC

AdaCampers (c) Mairin Duffy 2012

We encourage people of all genders to apply to the expanded allies track at AdaCamp. This is an all-day event on Saturday, June 8th, with the popular Allies Workshop in the morning and unconference sessions in the afternoon, organized by the attendees.

Learn more and apply here. AdaCamp San Francisco will be another amazing event, don’t miss it!


We thank our gold level sponsors Mozilla, Automattic and Google Site Reliability Engineering; and our silver level sponsors Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, and Puppet Labs; for their support of AdaCamp San Francisco.

Heroku, O'Reilly and the Python Software Foundation sponsor AdaCamp San Francisco

The Ada Initiative is pleased to welcome Heroku, O’Reilly, and the Python Software Foundation as the newest sponsors of AdaCamp San Francisco, our conference dedicated to increasing women’s participation in open technology and culture.

Heroku is the first AdaCamp supporting sponsor. Heroku is a cloud platform that allows app developers to spend their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. They’re presently hiring for roles from marketing to security and support engineering.

O’Reilly is the second AdaCamp supporting sponsor. O’Reilly has been chronicling technology since 1978, and spreads the knowledge of innovators through its books, online services, magazines, research, and conferences.

The Python Software Foundation (PSF) contributed $750 towards travel scholarships for Python community members. (Please note that applications for travel grants closed on April 12, the PSF grant will be awarded to existing applicants.) The PSF manage the open source licensing for Python version 2.1 and later and own and protect the trademarks associated with Python; run the North American PyCon conference annually, support other Python conferences around the world; and fund Python related development with their grants program. In late 2012, the PSF announced that all PSF-supported events needed to implement an anti-harassment policy, making their community more accessible and safe.

On behalf of women in open technology and culture, we thank Heroku, O’Reilly, and the Python Software Foundation for their generous support.

Why AdaCamp?

Why is AdaCamp so important to women in open technology and culture? Because AdaCamp measurably increases women’s participation in open technology and culture – in an environment that more often pushes women towards the door.

Most women who attend AdaCamp “lean in” to their careers and community work after AdaCamp. In our post-conference survey, 92% of survey respondents said AdaCamp increased their commitment to open technology and culture.

AdaCamp also increases women’s professional connections: 100% of survey respondents said AdaCamp increased their network in open tech/culture. Several AdaCamp attendees landed new jobs in open tech/culture through the connections they made at AdaCamp, and at least two won prestigious internships with Code for America and the GNOME Outreach Program for Women. One of the benefits of attending AdaCamp is joining the AdaCamp alumni mailing list, which members use to recruit job applicants, advertise events, and share career advice.

AdaCampers learn new skills at AdaCamp as well. Past AdaCamps included tutorials in Wikipedia editing, Python programming, and other open tech/culture topics. The tutorials were so popular that we are expanding them this year, and adding a “hackathon” (for all open tech/culture projects, not just coding).

Sponsorship

Your organization has the opportunity to join Automattic in sponsoring AdaCamp San Francisco, and reach 250 women leaders and future leaders in open technology and culture. Contact us at sponsors@adainitiative.org for more information about becoming a sponsor.

Apply to AdaCamp

Applications are open to attend AdaCamp San Francisco, to be held on Saturday June 8 and Sunday June 9 in San Francisco, California. All women who are interesting in meeting other women in open technology and culture, and learning and sharing about efforts to improve women’s participation in and the community environment of open technology and culture, are invited to apply. An allies track open to attendees of any gender will be held on Saturday June 8.


We thank our gold level sponsors Mozilla, Automattic and Google Site Reliability Engineering; and our silver level sponsors Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, and Puppet Labs; for their support of AdaCamp San Francisco.

AdaCamp news: when will I hear about my application? when do childcare requests close? where can I stay?

We are so excited to have received more than two hundred applications to attend AdaCamp San Francisco! Right now we’re deep in reviewing them and are sending out decisions and registration information as quickly as we can. We apologise to anyone who has been waiting for a decision. I’m basically working on nothing else until decisions are all sent!

If you haven’t heard from us yet

Applications are being reviewed progressively. If you haven’t heard from us yet, we have not reached your application in the review queue. (It definitely does not mean you’ve been rejected.) I apologise especially for the delay in notifying travel grant applicants.

We are working to the following timeline:

  • applicants who asked for international travel grants (applicants outside the USA, Canada and Mexico) will be notified today, May 1
  • applicants who asked for domestic travel grants (applicants from the USA, Canada and Mexico) will be notified by Friday May 3 at the latest
  • other applicants who applied before April 14 will be notified by Friday May 3 at the latest
  • applicants who applied between April 14 and April 30 will be notified by Tuesday May 7 at the latest, sooner if we can
  • applicants who apply between May 1 and May 6 will be notified by Tuesday May 14 at the latest, sooner if we can

Please contact adacamp@adainitiative.org if you were expecting a notification and have not received one by the dates above.

Childcare requests

AdaCamp is providing limited free childcare places for attendees. We need to finalise childcare numbers very soon, and therefore unfortunately need to close applications for childcare earlier than the May 6 deadline. If you want to request a free childcare place for AdaCamp, please apply by Friday May 2. After this, no more childcare requests can be taken.

If you have already applied and asked for a childcare place, our event planner will be in touch late this week or early next week to confirm your childcare needs.

Travel and accommodation information

If you have been accepted to AdaCamp, you may be interested in accommodation options and venue and transport information.

If you are interested in sharing a room with another attendee, and are willing for your name and email to be shared with other attendees for this purpose, please email adacamp@adainitiative.org.


We thank our gold level sponsors Mozilla, Automattic and Google Site Reliability Engineering; and our silver level sponsors Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Intel, and Puppet Labs; for their support of AdaCamp San Francisco.